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anni albers intersecting

The German textile artist blurred the lines between traditional craft and modern art. Intersecting was made when Albers was exploring ideas around written language: the lost codes of ancient texts and forms of communication such as weaving. Here, she creates a sense of rhythm and movement on a handloom. Albers’ artistic career began when she went to study at German art school Bauhaus in 1922, where she would meet her future husband, artist and educator Josef Albers, along with other famous modernist figures such as Paul Klee. Intersecting Colors: Josef Albers and His Contemporaries itself presents a generative ... courtesy the Josef and Anni Albers Foundation/Yale University Press. At the Bauhaus she studied under painters Paul Klee and Wassily Kandinsky, focusing on relationships between colors and the expressive potential of simple forms. Albers’s work is the subject of a new exhibition at the David Zwirner gallery in New York. Although she began weaving almost by default, Albers became among the 20th century’s defining “pictorial” textile artists. ‘Intersecting’ was created in 1962 by Anni Albers in Abstract Art style. Yet it’s also rooted in the history of weaving itself. ‘Intersecting’ was created in 1962 by Anni Albers in Abstract Art style. Albers arrived at the Bauhaus in Weimar, Germany in 1922, but was limited in the coursework she could pursue as certain disciplines were not taught to women. Find more prominent pieces of abstract at Wikiart.org – best visual art database. Albers arrived at the Bauhaus in Weimar, Germany in 1922, but was limited in the coursework she could pursue as certain disciplines were not taught to women. Anni Albers in her weaving studio at Black Mountain College, 1937. Printmaker and textile artist Anni Albers is widely recognized both for her geometric patterned compositions and deep involvement with the Bauhaus and Black Mountain College, teaching at the latter between 1933 and 1949. Its title suggests the medium’s basics – the meeting of warp and weft – as well as its greater cultural resonance. Josef Albers, Homage to the Square: Rooted, 1961. Albers arrived at the Bauhaus in Weimar, Germany in 1922, but was limited in the coursework she could pursue as certain disciplines were not taught to women. Image courtesy of the Josef and Anni Albers Foundation. Limited-Edition Prints by Leading Artists, Study for an unexecuted wallhanging, 1926, Four works: (i) Triangulated Intaglio II; (ii) Triangulated Intaglio III; (iii) Triangulated Intaglio IV; (iv) Triangulated Intaglio V, Bankside Power Station, London. She then married leading Bauhaus figure and renowned color theorist Josef Albers in 1925. Anni Albers’s Intersecting: geometric language The German textile artist blurred the lines between traditional craft and modern art. “Intersecting” (1962, cotton and rayon) and “Knot” (1962, gouache on paper) Under pressure from the Nazis, the Bauhaus school closed in 1933. While the future seemed to lie in the gleaming, hard surfaces of skyscrapers and rockets, her tactile creations, wrought on a handloom, went in the opposite direction. The great modernist weaver Anni Albers made one of the earliest forms of cultural expression relevant to the 20th century. Albers … In addition to frequent conversations with her many friends and colleagues, Albers drew inspiration from the pre-Columbian art she viewed during travels throughout Mexico and the Americas. A member of the Bauhaus who fled to the U.S. in 1933, his ideas about how the mind understands color influenced generations of students, inspired countless artists, and anticipated the findings of neuroscience in the latter half of the twentieth century. Introduction 3 Hecht (1892–1947) showed the immense sensitivity of the eye’s photosensitive On view August 28, 2015 – January 3, 2016. Anni Albers, Intersecting, 1962, pictorial weaving, cotton and rayon, 400 x 419 mm. The lines that wander down its vibrant vertical red, white and blue stripes suggest many things to the modern eye: Japanese calligraphy, scroll art, the rhythms of speech or music, the scribbles of a lie detector test, perhaps. Josef Albers (1888–1976) was an artist, teacher, and seminal thinker on the perception of color.

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